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mamtc

Thursday, March 15, 2012

Eagles snatching the immortality elixir - Pjazi/Idun and Garuda/Amirtha


Pjazi and Idun
In Norse mythology,
Pjazi(eagle) kidnapped Loki when he tried to choo away the eagle and to release him from that Loki made a deal with Pjazi-eagle.
Deal:
Loki was to lure Idun-possessor of immortality secret - apples, out of Asgard.
Mission:
Loki lured her out by saying that he found similar apples  and wanted her to appraise or authenticate by comparing with those of hers - The apples of immortality.The secret of norse god's everlasting youth was Idun and her apples.
When she came out, Pjazi came again in eagle form and kidnapped Idun and as well as her apples.
Rescue:
When other gods realised Loki's involvement in disappearance of Idun, they forced him to retrieve her back. He took the form of a falcon and flew to Pjazi's place and turned Idun to a nut and brought her back to Asgard.
Aftermath:
When Pjazi came chasing back in eagle form the gods set fire on him and he fell dead.

Garuda and Amirtha
In Hindu mythology,
Garuda(eagle) had to release his mommy from the servitude from her sister and his cousin-brother serpents.
Deal:
In order to achieve that he had to steal immortality nectar Amritha from heaven.
Mission:
Garuda was able to retrieve Amirtha by signing couple of truces with Vishnu and Indra.  He offered himself as official vehicle for Lord Vishnu. The other one was with Indra.
Rescue:
He placed Amritha on the ground to the serpents thereby fulfilling his end of bargain to release his mommy, and advised them to take bath before consuming the immortality nectar. When they left Indra snatched the nectar back
Aftermath:
The serpents came back from their ablutions and saw the elixir gone but with small droplets of it on the grass. They tried to lick the droplets and thereby split their tongues in two. From then onwards, serpents have split tongues and shed their skin as a kind of immortality.

Moral of the story: Read the deal/contract twice or thrice before accepting. And watchout for the doublecrossers.

19 comments:

  1. i remember hearing this story on that ancient alien show.

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  2. There is always some fine print, how things are worded that get you time and time again, so yeah one must read over and over as Loki and the others may be quite tricky, i.e. lawyers now a days.

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    1. "As long as there are tests, there are going to be prayers"
      If there are no doublecrossers, lawyers shall be jobless.

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  3. A very true moral, I love these I really do!

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    1. Thank you lurker. Hopefully atleast if Franoians follow this I shall be happy.

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  4. The explanation for the splitted tongue is quite amusing.

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    1. I know right. This is one reason why I dig mythology.some stories are damn cite and pure imagination

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  5. Good advice... apples seem to crop up in mythology quite a lot

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    1. Thank you. Yeah, what's with apples anyway?

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  6. i liked him in the thor movie

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  7. LOL, exceedingly good morals to remember! Also, being a good guy in classic mythology doesn't inexactly mean you're going to be honorable...or good.

    MAN, the Greek and Norse gods could be absolute and total dicks when they wanted to be. ;3 Hell, EVERY pantheon has done something dickish once or twice, multiple times in the Greek pantheon. Zeus wasn't even a NORMAL player, he just knocked up whoever the hell he felt like. Men, women, animals, abstract ideals...just dayum.

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    1. Yeah. Agree with you, word by word. Zeus- King of gods rite? And he is the worst example for a leader. Cheater, pedophile, incest, and nepotism and what not?

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  8. not once but but THRICE! ha. That's a Simpsons reference that I love throwing out whenever I can. Awesome Mythological tidbits btw.

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    1. I didnt know that Homer Simpson used that. I dont remember where learned that phrase from or from when I started using that. Maybe Homer and me have more things in common. I know for sure I cant never match his IQ.

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  9. I too loved the thrice reference (but I thought it was a Conan O'Brien reference). It's fun to see how different traditions work with the same basic moral thought. Maybe the handshake deal I made to sell my kidney to the guy in the van with the naked lady riding a dragon painted on the side, who called himself a doctor, wasn't a great idea.

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    1. Pickleope, knowing you I can strongly say that, that guy signed his death petition by shaking hands with you making a deal.

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  10. Are you sure the moral doesn't have something to do with avoid becoming immortal?

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